Select a Site:


BACK TO MAIN BLOG

How Zinc Impacts Wheat Production

How Zinc Impacts Wheat Production

The macro impact micronutrients have on your crop's potential

A field may have been tested, managed and treated to meet a wheat crop’s macronutrient needs (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and water) but micronutrient deficiency can prevent the crop from reaching its full yield potential. Zinc is a micronutrient for wheat but its potential effect on a wheat crop is not small.

It is well known wheat that has adequate zinc displays stronger emergence, faster stand establishment, healthier root growth, greater plant vigor and increased yield potential.

Wheat requires zinc in small but critical concentrations for several key actions, including:

  • Seedling vigor
  • Photosynthesis
  • Plant and seed grain membrane functions
  • Protein synthesis
  • Sugar formation
  • Phytohormone synthesis (for example, auxin)
  • Defense against disease and stress factors (such as improved drought resistance)

Additional available zinc improves early season performance, which can set wheat up for increased yields. Even when a plant’s macronutrients of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and water are met, zinc deficiency can prevent plants from reaching their full potential.

Latest blog posts

You know Phosphorus is essential to the success of your crops. You also know how hard it can be to keep Phosphorus where it’s applied. Being one of the three necessary macronutrients vital to plant health (Nitrogen and Potassium being the other two), you want to see 100% nutrient intake when you spend time and […]

Farm and family life are inextricably linked to Dan Crossley. After all, the lifelong Idaho native was raised on the family farm – where he learned the jobs and the value of hard work by his wonderful parents. It was on that farm where Dan learned to milk cows, build and repair fences, haul hay […]

It shouldn’t be surprising that someone whose career and education focused on crop physiology, plant nutrition, root biology and more would go to work every single day with a goal of developing ag breakthroughs. Amy Burton does just that.